The Full Wiki

2012 phenomenon: Timeline

Advertisements
  
  
  
  
  

Advertisements
  • 900: Though the Long Count was most likely invented by the Olmec,[7] it has become closely associated with the Maya civilization, whose classic period lasted from 250 to 900 AD. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1750s: Edmonson does not support this reading; he considers the Long Count almost entirely absent from the book, since the 360-day tun been supplanted in the 1750s by a 365-day Christian year, and a 24-round may system was being implemented. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1752: Perhaps 'After Death' will be the subject of his discourse." Makemson was still relying on her own dating of 13.0.0.0.0 to 1752 and therefore the "not too distant future" in her annotations meant a few years after the scribe in Tizimin recorded his Chilam Balam. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1926: Colorado) along with other Mayanism proponents and New Age authors like Jose Arguelles, has written books contributing to the modern popularization of syncretic beliefs in which elements of Maya calendrics are highlighted in the supposed significance of dates in December 2012 A.D. - Tony Shearer, Wikipedia.
  • 1957: The early Mayanist and astronomer Maud Worcester Makemson wrote that "the completion of a Great Period of 13 b'ak'tuns would have been of the utmost significance to the Maya". - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1966: The anthropologist Munro S. Edmonson added that "there appears to be a strong likelihood that the eral calendar, like the year calendar, was motivated by a long-range astronomical prediction, one that made a correct solsticial forecast 2,367 years into the future in 355 B.C." (sic)[14] In 1966, Michael D. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1970s: According to Terence McKenna, who conceived the idea over several years in the early-mid 1970s while using psilocybin mushrooms and DMT, the universe has a teleological attractor at the end of time that increases interconnectedness, eventually reaching a singularity of infinite complexity in 2012, at which point anything and everything imaginable will occur simultaneously. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1975: B'ak'tun 13 became the subject of speculation by several New Age authors. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • December 24, 1975: In his book Mexico Mystique: The Coming Sixth Age of Consciousness, Frank Waters tied Coe's December 24, 2011 date to astrology and the prophecies of the Hopi,[36] while both José Argüelles and Terence McKenna (in their books The Transformative Vision[37] and The Invisible Landscape[38][39] respectively) discussed the significance of the year 2012, but not a specific day. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1983: [citation needed] It was only in 1983, with the publication of Sharer's revised table of date correlations in the 4th edition of Morley's The Ancient Maya, that each became convinced that December 21, 2012 had significant meaning. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1987: The year in which he held the Harmonic Convergence event, Arguelles settled on the date of December 21 in his book The Mayan Factor: Path Beyond Technology,[40][41] in which he claimed on that date the Earth would pass through a great "beam" from the centre of the Galaxy, and that the Maya aligned their calendar in anticipation of that event. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1990s: Coe's apocalyptic connotations were accepted by other scholars through the early 1990s. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1993: McKenna subsequently peppered this specific date throughout the second, 1993 edition of The Invisible Landscape.[34] - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1995: This idea, which has been circulating since 1995 in New Age circles and initially slated the event for 2003, is based on claims of channeling from alien beings and has been widely ridiculed. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1998: Jenkins himself notes that, even given his determined location for the line of the galactic equator, its most precise convergence with the centre of the Sun already occurred in 1998. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 1998: Apart from the fact noted above that the "galactic alignment" predicted by Jenkins already happened in 1998, the Sun's apparent path through the zodiac as seen from Earth does not take it near the true galactic center, but rather several degrees above it. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2003: Pinchbeck claims to discern a "growing realization that materialism and the rational, empirical worldview that comes with it has reached its expiration date...[w]e're on the verge of transitioning to a dispensation of consciousness that's more intuitive, mystical and shamanic."[62] Beginning in 2003, he has promoted these ideas annually in presentations at Burning Man. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2006: Author Daniel Pinchbeck popularised New Age concepts about this date in his book 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl, linking it to beliefs about crop circles, alien abduction, and personal revelations based on the use of entheogens and mediumship. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2006: This view has been promulgated by History Channel which, beginning in 2006, aired "Decoding the Past: Mayan Doomsday Prophecy", based loosely on John Major Jenkins' theories but with a tone he characterized as "45 minutes of unabashed doomsday hype and the worst kind of inane sensationalism". - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Scholars from various disciplines have dismissed the idea that a catastrophe will happen in 2012, stating that predictions of impending doom are found neither in classic Maya accounts nor in contemporary science. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: NASA has compared fears about 2012 to those about the Y2K bug in the late 1990s, suggesting that an adequate analysis should preclude fears of disaster. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: A far more apocalyptic view of the year 2012 has also spread in various media. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Others suggest that the 2012 date marks the end of the world or a similar catastrophe. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: According to the hypothesis, the Sun precisely aligns with this intersection point at the winter solstice of 2012. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: In the mid-1990s, John Major Jenkins asserted that the ancient Maya intended to tie the end of their calendar to the winter solstice in 2012, which falls on December 21. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Mayan archaeologist Jose Huchm has stated that "If I went to some Mayan-speaking communities and asked people what is going to happen in 2012, they wouldn't have any idea. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Mayanist Anthony Aveni says that while the idea of "balancing the cosmos" was prominent in ancient Maya literature, and some modern Maya affirm this idea of an age of coexistence, the 2012 phenomenon does not present this message in its original form. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: The first edition of The Invisible Landscape refers to 2012 (as the year, not a specific day) only twice. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Discovery Channel also aired 2012 Apocalypse in 2009, suggesting that massive solar storms, flipping of the magnetic poles, earthquakes, super volcanoes, and more may occur in 2012. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Mainstream Mayanist scholars state that the idea that the Long Count calendar "ends" in 2012 misrepresents Maya history. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: The 2012 phenomenon comprises a range of eschatological beliefs that cataclysmic or transformative events will occur on December 21 or December 23, 2012,[1][2] which is said to be the end-date of a 5,125-year-long cycle in the Mayan Long Count calendar. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: A New Age interpretation of this transition posits that during this time, Earth and its inhabitants may undergo a positive physical or spiritual transformation, and that 2012 may mark the beginning of a new era. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Some versions of this idea associate the theory of a 2012 "galactic alignment" with that of a very different "galactic alignment" proposed by some scientists to explain a supposed periodicity in mass extinctions in the fossil record. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: This show proved popular and was followed by many sequels: 2012, End of Days (2006), The Last Days on Earth (2008), Seven Signs of the Apocalypse, and Nostradamus 2012 (2008). - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: In India, the guru Kalki Bhagavan has promoted 2012 as a "deadline" for human enlightenment since at least 1998. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Established themes found in 2012 literature include "suspicion towards mainstream Western culture", the idea of spiritual evolution, and the possibility of leading the world into the New Age, by individual example or by a group's joined consciousness. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Cartman interpreted the large amount of minorities at his favorite water park as a sign of the 2012 phenomenon, the prediction that cataclysmic events will occur in the year 2012, which is said to be the end of the Mayan Long Count calendar. - South Park (season 13), Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Charlie references a theory that suggests the Mayans predicted the world would come to an end in 2012, and claims he has knowledge and a map of the ark project. - 2012 (film), Wikipedia.
  • 2012: He considers 2012 as a deadline for his teaching. - Kalki Bhagavan, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: The story reveals that two floating cities appeared above Tokyo and Sendai around the end of 2012. - RahXephon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: His writings are particularly associated with 2012 millenarianism and the development of Mayanism in contempary and popular culture, as an outgrowth from the New Age milieu. - John Major Jenkins, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: The album features a mixture of traditional folk songs in Circulus's usual medieval rock style, but is also part concept album, telling the story of leaving Earth aboard a spaceship to escape from the chaos of the Mayan 2012 phenomenon. - Thought Becomes Reality, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Aveni, who has studied New Age and SETI communities, describes 2012 narratives as the product of a "disconnected" society: "Unable to find spiritual answers to life's big questions within ourselves, we turn outward to imagined entities that lie far off in space or time—entities that just might be in possession of superior knowledge."[35] - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Millenarians give more credence to Novelty theory as a way to predict the future (especially regarding 2012) than McKenna himself. - Terence McKenna, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: "There is nothing in the Maya or Aztec or ancient Mesoamerican prophecy to suggest that they prophesied a sudden or major change of any sort in 2012," says Mayanist scholar Mark Van Stone, "The notion of a "Great Cycle" coming to an end is completely a modern invention."[18] In their seminal work of 1990, the Maya scholars Linda Schele and David Freidel, who reference Edmonson, argue that the Maya "did not conceive this to be the end of creation, as many have suggested,"[19] citing Mayan predictions of events to occur after the end of the 13th b'ak'tun. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: He now asserts that the project has predicted that the world will end on December 21, 2012. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: A relatively common example is the 2012 doomsday prediction. - Internet meme, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: There are a variety of popular beliefs about the year 2012. - 2012, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: George Noory also takes interest in the 2012 Doomsday prediction, and believes something will happen. - Coast to Coast AM, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: According to Thomas, Heene was a fan of David Icke who was motivated by fears stemming from the 2012 phenomenon to raise money to build a bunker as a survivalist strategy for 2012. - Balloon boy hoax, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Major catastrophe in 2012 - The Web Bot has gained most of its notoriety for contributing to the 2012 phenomenon by predicting that a cataclysm will devastate the planet in the year 2012, possibly a reversing of Earth's magnetic poles or a small series of nuclear attacks leading up to a major attack on this day. - Web Bot, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Major catastrophe in 2012 - The Web Bot has gained most of its notoriety for contributing to the 2012 phenomenon by predicting that a cataclysm will devastate the planet in the year 2012, possibly a reversing of Earth's magnetic poles or a small series of nuclear attacks leading up to a major attack on this day. - Web Bot, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: New Age and the 2012 phenomenon, could be interpreted as building on at least some fin de siècle ideas. - Fin de siècle, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: The film briefly references Mayanism, the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar, and the 2012 phenomenon in its portrayal of cataclysmic events unfolding in 2012. - 2012 (film), Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Theorists and studiers of the 2012 Mayan Calendar prediction. - Category:2012 theorists, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: 2012 phenomenon - Category:2012, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: 2012 phenomenon - Mass hysteria, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: "Pee" also includes several references to the 2012 phenomenon, the prediction that cataclysmic events will occur in the year 2012, which is said to be the end of the Mayan Long Count calendar. - Pee (South Park), Wikipedia.
  • 2012: 2012 phenomenon - Category:Prophecy, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: 2012 phenomenon - Category:Numerology, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: 2012 phenomenon, metaphysical prediction centered on December 21, 2012 - 2012 (disambiguation), Wikipedia.
  • 2012: 2012 phenomenon - Category:Esotericism, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: 2012 phenomenon - Category:Eschatology, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: His most recent film is 2012,[24] an apocalyptic disaster film inspired by the theory that the ancient Mayans prophesied the world's ending on December 21, 2012. - Roland Emmerich, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: 2012 phenomenon - Category:Apocalypticism, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: 2012 phenomenon - Category:Maya calendars, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Knowing sees Nicolas Cage as a teacher who discovers a set of numbers on an ordinary piece of paper that are actually the dates, death tolls and locations of disaster events, both in the past, and in the near future, while 2012, an ultimate disaster film based on the real life supposed doomsday prediction by the Mayans, sees various ultimate disasters bring the world to an end. - Disaster film, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: 2012 phenomenon - Category:2012 millenarianism, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Assassin's Creed features the Knights of the Templar and towards the end of the game it also makes numerous references to the Illuminati and the Maya calendar's 2012 doomsday prediction. - Conspiracy fiction, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Nibiru or Planet X: a supposed impending disastrous encounter between Earth and a large astronomical object, usually slated for 2012 - Nibiru, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: According to Argüelles and others, the Harmonic Convergence also began the final 26-year countdown to the end of the Mayan Long Count in 2012, which would be the so-called end of history and the beginning of a new 5,125-year cycle. - Harmonic Convergence, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Also, the Maya 2012 doomsday prediction has mystical and/or religious underpinnings. - Survivalism, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: "For example, you could doubt my much-vaunted prediction that the world will become unrecognizable by 2012; but do you doubt for a moment that by 2012, every major religion on Earth will have vast simulations of its eschatological vision for you to wander in and try out– so that you can look in on Nirvana.com, or lope over to the Celestial City, or look in on Sufi paradise?" - Terence McKenna, Wikiquote.
  • 2012: The film is an imagining of the events predicted to occur in 2012, a literal and "blasphemous" interpretation which combines the Book of Revelations with the false assumption that the Mayan Calendar is a timeline for destruction. - 2012 Doomsday, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Some people who have New Age or apocalyptic beliefs interpret the end of the current Mesoamerican Long Count calendar cycle as a sign that a doomsday event, the so-called 2012 phenomenon, will occur sometime around the 2012 winter solstice. - Doomsday event, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: Martin claims that these aliens, flying aboard 'The Great Mother Ship' to which he is taken every time he is willingly "abducted," have given him this knowledge so that he can produce and sell hand-drawings of these symbols, which will allow passage aboard the Mother Ship when the Earth is 'transformed' in 2012. - Riley Martin, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: In December 2007, Project Camelot released a 3-part ~3 hour interview with Hoagland[9] where he talks about "the secret history of NASA", he shows lunar images and elaborates on his various claims about the moon, and he talks about a variety of topics such as "hyperdimensional physics", ancient monuments, the Vatican, consciousness, and the year 2012. - Richard C. Hoagland, Wikipedia.
  • 2012: The History Channel has also been criticized for paying too much attention to non-historical subjects such as UFOs and for spreading disinformation about Nostradamus,[5] as well as for playing a major role in propagating the 2012 Doomsday prediction myth,[6] usually with scant reference to established scholarship,[7] with the result that it has also been dubbed[8] "The Mystery Channel" or "The Pseudo-History Channel", as well as "The Hysteria Channel". - History (TV channel), Wikipedia.
  • November, 2012: He believed the events of any given time are recursively related to the events of other times, and chose the atomic bombing of Hiroshima as the basis for calculating his end date in November 2012. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: Today, the most widely accepted correlations of the end of the thirteenth b'ak'tun, or Mayan date 13.0.0.0.0, with the Western calendar are either December 21 or December 23, 2012. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • December, 2012: December 2012 marks the ending of the current b'ak'tun cycle of the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar, which was used in Central America prior to the arrival of Europeans. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: In the United States, the association of December 21, 2012 with a "transformation of consciousness" has also received popular attention in The Lost Symbol (2009), a bestseller work of thriller fiction by Dan Brown, in which the date is associated with references to esoteric beliefs of Freemasonry and noetic theory. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: The belief that the Mayan civilization's Long Count calendar ends abruptly on December 21, 2012, is a misconception due to the Mayan practice of using only five places in Long Count Calendar inscriptions. - Risks to civilization, humans and planet Earth, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: Misinterpretation of the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar is the basis for a New Age belief that a cataclysm will take place on December 21, 2012. - Maya calendar, Wikipedia.
  • December 22, 2012: In New Mexico, Scully and Mulder arrive at a pueblo where a dying Cigarette Smoking Man is hiding out to survive the colonization — an event that will happen on December 22, 2012 (first alluded to in "Red Museum" / episode 2X10). - The Truth (The X-Files), Wikipedia.
  • December, 2012: Our present universe [would] be annihilated [in December 2012][a] when the Great Cycle of the Long Count reaches completion."[15] - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: It is based on an end of the world event on December 21, 2012. - 21st century, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: Would end with the birth of the 6th Sun and the 5th Earth on December 21, 2012. - Harmonic Convergence, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: Amao also states that the Mayan Long Count calendar, that has an end-date of December 21, 2012, is associated with precession of the equinoxes and therefore can provide an important demarcation for the Age of Aquarius. - Age of Aquarius, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: Articles related to predictions of what may happen on December 21, 2012. - Category:2012 millenarianism, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: Quazedelic is one of few Hip-Hop artists that acknowledges the date of December 21, 2012. - Quazedelic, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: The messages all deal with various forms of the end of the world from different cultures, including several references to the date December 21, 2012, the date that Abstergo plans to launch a satellite that will "permanently end the war". - Assassin's Creed, Wikipedia.
  • December 22, 2012: The final episode of The X-Files sets December 22, 2012 as the date for alien colonization. - 21st century, Wikipedia.
  • December 22, 2012: Years later, on December 22, 2012, the world is about to end, just as predicted. - The Invisibles, Wikipedia.
  • December 21, 2012: The Anaal Nathrakh song "Timewave Zero" is about the apparent end of the world on December 21, 2012. - 2012, Genealogy_wikia.
  • December, 2012: December 2012 doomsday prediction, 12/12, in calendar date format of mm/yy or yy/mm. - 1212, Wikipedia.
  • 2013: Also, NOAA now predicts that the solar maximum will peak in 2013, not 2012, and that it will be fairly weak, with a below-average number of sunspots. - 2012 phenomenon, Wikipedia.
Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message