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Female ejaculation: Timeline

  
  
  

  • 1880: Anatomical knowledge was also advanced by Alexander Skene's description of para-urethral or periurethral glands (glands around the urethra) in 1880, which have been variously claimed to be one source of the fluids in the ejaculate, and now commonly referred to as the Skene's glands. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1886: Krafft-Ebing's study of sexual perversion, Psychopathia Sexualis (1886), describes female ejaculation under the heading "Congenital Sexual Inversion in Women" as a perversion related to neurasthenia and homosexuality. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1905: It is also described by Freud in pathological terms in his study of Dora (1905), where he relates it to hysteria. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1918: Thus we find Almeda Sperry writing to Emma Goldman in 1918, about the "rhythmic spurt of your love juices". - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1926: Female ejaculation is mentioned as normal in early 20th century 'marriage manuals', such as TH Van de Velde's Ideal Marriage: Its Physiology and Technique (1926). - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1929: Female ejaculation appears in 20th century anthropological works, such as Malinowski's Melanesian study, The Sexual Life of Savages (1929), and Gladwin and Sarason's "Truk: Man in Paradise" (1956). - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1948: Huffman, an American gynaecologist, published his studies of the prostatic tissue in women together with an historical account and detailed drawings. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1950: A more definitive contemporary account of ejaculation appeared shortly after, in 1950, with the publication of an essay by Gräfenberg based on his observations of women during orgasm. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1953: However this paper made little impact, and was dismissed in the major sexological writings of that time, such as Kinsey (1953)[36] and Masters and Johnson (1966),[37] equating this "erroneous belief" with urinary stress incontinence. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • March 12, 1967: Fallon (born on March 12, 1967) is an American pornographic actress known as the first to perform ejaculating orgasms on film. - Fallon (pornographic actress), Wikipedia.
  • 1978: The topic did not receive serious attention again until a review by Josephine Lowndes Sevely and JW Bennett appeared in 1978. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1978: Josephine Sevely then followed up her 1978 study by publishing "Eve's Secrets: A new theory of female sexuality" in 1987, emphasising an integrated rather than fragmented approach to understanding female sexuality, with the clitoris, vagina and urethra depicted as a single sexual organ. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1980s: However, scientific studies from the 1980s and later have demonstrated that the substance produced is distinct from urine, though it does show similarities such as alkalinity with urine. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1981: Whipple continued to publicise her discoveries, including a 9 min video made in 1981 Orgasmic Expulsions of Fluid in the Sexually Stimulated Female. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1981: Early work was contradictory; the initial study on one woman by Addiego and colleagues reported in 1981,[41] could not be confirmed in a subsequent study on 11 women in 1983, [73] but was confirmed in another 7 women in 1984. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1981: This latter paper, which traces the history of the controversies to that point, and a series of three papers in 1981 by Beverly Whipple and colleagues in the Journal of Sex Research,[40][41][42] became the focal point of the current debate. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1982: The discussion entered popular culture in 1982 with the publication of the bestselling The G Spot and Other Recent Discoveries About Human Sexuality, by Ladas, Whipple, and Perry. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1982: Bohlen explained the accepted wisdom;[44] - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1982: (emphasis in original) yet dismissed it (p. 135) - "female ejaculation is an erroneous but widespread concept", and even twenty years later in 1982,[38] they repeated the statement that it was erroneous (p. 69-70) and the result of "urinary stress incontinence". - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1983: The eleven specimens analyzed by Goldberg in 1983,[73] ranged from 3–15 mL (0.6–3.0 tsp). - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1983: Nevertheless, the theory advanced by these authors was immediately dismissed by many other authors, such as physiologist Joseph Bohlen,[44] for not being based on rigorous scientific procedures, and psychiatrist Helen Singer Kaplan (1983) stated;[45] - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1983: 1983 pp. 74–5) - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1984: The Journal of Sex Research described the debate as 'heated' in 1984. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1985: A different group studied 27 women, and found only urine,[56] suggesting that results depend critically on the methods used. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1985: Even some radical feminist writers, such as Sheila Jeffreys (1985) were dismissive, claiming it as a figment of male fantasy;[46] - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1994: For instance Kratochvíl (1994) surveyed 200 women and found that 6% reported ejaculating, an additional 13% had some experience and about 60% reported release of fluid without actual gushing. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1996: More possible references to female ejaculation also exist later in Indian erotic texts, such as the Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana (Bechtel 1996) and the sixteenth century Ananga Ranga. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 1998: It required the detailed anatomical work of Helen O'Connell[47] from 1998 onwards to more properly elucidate the relationships between the different anatomical structures involved. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 2002: The continuing debate is further illustrated in the angry exchange of letters between the author and researchers in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in 2002 following the publication of 'The G-spot: A modern gynecological myth' by Terrence Hines. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 2002: (See also Chalker 2002 pp. 531–2, Ladas et al. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • November, 2002: He insured his hands with Lloyds of London for $2,000,000 each, as a publicity stunt to raise the profile of female ejaculation. - Axel Braun, Wikipedia.
  • 2003: She has appeared in over 200 films since 2003,[1] and is known for her ability to squirt during her scenes. - Angela Stone, Wikipedia.
  • 2005: Block produced, directed and hosted Dr. Suzy's Squirt Salon: Secrets of Female Ejaculation, featuring Deborah Sundahl and Annie Body, premiering at the Barcelona Erotic Film Festival and New York's CineKink Film Festival. - Susan Block, Wikipedia.
  • 2006: 2006 AVN Award nominee – Best Threeway Sex Scene – Flower’s Squirt Shower[4] - Angela Stone, Wikipedia.
  • 2007: A 2007 study on two women involved ultrasound, endoscopy, and biochemical analysis of fluid. - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 2007: As of 2007,[5][66] and 2008[65] the existence of a female prostate and of ejaculation are a matter of debate, and articles and book chapters continue to appear with subtitles such as "Fact or Fantasy". - Female ejaculation, Wikipedia.
  • 2007: 2007 AVN Award nominee – Most Outrageous Sex Scene – The Great American Squirt Off[5] - Angela Stone, Wikipedia.
  • 2009: 2009 AVN Award nominee – Most Outrageous Sex Scene – Squirt Gangbang 2[6] - Angela Stone, Wikipedia.
  • 2009: 2009 AVN Award nominee – Best All-Girl Group Sex Scene – Flower's Squirt Shower 5[6] - Angela Stone, Wikipedia.






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