Frank Sinatra: Timeline

  
  
  
  
  
  

  • 1910s

  • 1930s

    • 1930s: During the tough years of the 1930s, when the Great Depression hit North America, Dolly nevertheless provided ready pocket money to Frank, the family's only child, for outings with friends and fancy clothes. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1930s: It was in the early 1930s that Sinatra began singing in public. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1935: Sinatra got his first break in 1935 when his mother persuaded a local singing group, The Three Flashes, to let him join. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1935: Sinatra left the Hoboken 4 and returned home in late 1935. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • November, 1939: In a meeting at the Palmer House in Chicago, Sinatra was asked by bandleader Tommy Dorsey to join his band as a replacement for Jack Leonard, who had recently left to launch a solo career. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
  • 1940s

    • January 26, 1940: Sinatra made his first public appearance with the Dorsey band at the Coronado Theater in Rockford, IL. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1940s: The FBI kept Sinatra under surveillance for almost five decades beginning in the 1940s. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • May, 1941: Sinatra was at the top of the male singer polls in the Billboard and Downbeat magazines. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • January, 1942: Sinatra recorded his first solo sessions without the Dorsey band (but with Dorsey's arranger Axel Stordahl and with Dorsey's approval). - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1942: Sinatra left the Dorsey band late in 1942 in an incident that started rumors of Sinatra's involvement with the Mafia. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • December 31, 1942: Sinatra opened at the Paramount Theater in New York. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • June 1, 1943: Sinatra signed with Columbia on June 1, 1943 as a solo artist, and he had initially great success, particularly during the 1942-43 musicians' strike. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1943: When the recording was re–released in 1943 with Sinatra’s name prominently displayed, the record was on the best–selling list for 18 weeks and reached number 2 on June 2, 1943. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • December 11, 1943: He was classified 4-F ("Registrant not acceptable for military service") for a perforated eardrum by his draft board. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1944: After sending a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Sinatra was invited to meet Roosevelt at the White House, where he agreed to become part of the Democratic party's voter registration drives. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1944: He donated $5,000 to the Democrats for the 1944 presidential election, and by the end of the campaign was appearing at two or three political events every day. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1945: Sinatra spoke at a number of New Jersey high schools in 1945, where students had gone on strike in opposition to racial integration. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1945: Sinatra co-starred with Gene Kelly in Anchors Aweigh. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1948: Sinatra supported the candidacy of Henry A. Wallace. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1948: By the end of 1948, Sinatra felt that his career was stalling, something that was confirmed when he slipped to No. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1949: The year 1949 saw an upswing, as Frank co-starred with Gene Kelly in Take Me Out to the Ball Game. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1949: Take Me Out to the Ball Game is a 1949 Technicolor musical film starring Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra. - Take Me Out to the Ball Game (film), Wikipedia.
    • 1949: He recorded with Frank Sinatra and was killed in an automobile accident after a session. - Herbie Haymer, Wikipedia.
  • 1950s

  • 1960s

  • 1970s

    • February 27, 1970: Sinatra sang at the White House as part of a tribute to Senator Everett Dirksen. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • November, 1970: The League drew further publicity when in November 1970 Frank Sinatra headlined a benefit for the League at Madison Square Garden. - Joseph Colombo, Wikipedia.
    • June 12, 1971: — at a concert in Hollywood to raise money for the Motion Picture and TV Relief Fund — at the age of 55, Sinatra announced that he was retiring, bringing to an end his 36-year career in show business. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1971: Sinatra attempted to weather the changing tastes in popular music, but with sales of his music dwindling, and after appearing in several poorly received films, he retired in 1971. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1972: After a lifetime of supporting Democratic presidential candidates, Sinatra supported Richard Nixon for re-election in the 1972 presidential election. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1973: Sinatra came out of retirement with a television special and album, both entitled Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 1973: Agnew was charged with corruption and resigned as Vice President; Sinatra helped Agnew pay some of his legal bills. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • January, 1974: Sinatra returned to Las Vegas, performing at Caesars Palace despite vowing in 1970 never to play there again after the manager of the resort, Sanford Waterman, pulled a gun on him during a heated argument. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • October, 1974: Sinatra appeared at New York City's Madison Square Garden in a televised concert that was later released as an album under the title The Main Event – Live. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • September 20, 1975: 20 September 1975: Billy Crystal, Frank Sinatra, Bay City Rollers - Saturday Night Live with Howard Cosell, Wikipedia.
    • November 19, 1977: Goldwyn and produced by Hugh Benson, Renee Valente and Frank Sinatra, Contract on Cherry Street was trumpeted as a major event that garnered positive reviews and strong ratings when it premiered on NBC on November 19 1977. - Contract on Cherry Street, Wikipedia.
    • October, 1978: The song did not become a popular hit until it was picked up in concert by Frank Sinatra during his performances at Radio City Music Hall in October 1978. - Theme from New York, New York, Wikipedia.
    • 1979: In front of the Egyptian pyramids, Sinatra performed for Anwar Sadat. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
  • 1980s

  • 1990s

  • 2000s

    • 2002: The Hoboken Post Office was renamed in his honor in 2002. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • December 12, 2007: The design of the stamp was unveiled Wednesday, December 12, 2007 — on the anniversary of what would have been his 92nd birthday — in Beverly Hills, CA, with Sinatra family members on hand. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • May 20, 2008: Congress passed a resolution on May 20, 2008 designating May 13 as Frank Sinatra Day to honor his contribution to American culture. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.
    • 2008: Nothing But the Best is a 2008 compilation album by American singer Frank Sinatra. - Nothing But the Best (album), Wikipedia.
    • March 30, 2009: "If you possess something but you can't give it away, then you don't possess it... it possesses you." - Frank Sinatra, Wikiquote.
    • May, 2009: To commemorate the anniversary of Sinatra's death, Patsy's Restaurant in New York City, which Sinatra was very fond of and a regular at, exhibited in May 2009 15 never before released photos of Sinatra that were taken by Bobby Bank. - Frank Sinatra, Wikipedia.






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