Pink Floyd: Timeline

  
  
  
  
  
  
  

  • 1950s

  • 1960s


    • 1960

      • 1960s: Pink Floyd were an English rock band who earned recognition for their psychedelic music in the late 1960s, and as they evolved in the 1970s, for their progressive rock music. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
      • 1960s: David Gilmour was already acquainted with Barrett, having studied modern language in the early 1960s at Cambridge Tech while Barrett studied art. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.

    • 1963

      • September, 1963: Mason and Waters moved into the lower flat of Stanhope Gardens, owned by Mike Leonard, a part-time tutor at the Regent Street Polytechnic. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.

    • 1964

      • 1964: Barrett joined the Tea Set in 1964 and moved into Stanhope Gardens alongside Klose and Waters. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
      • December, 1964: Minus Wright—who had taken a break from studying—the band first performed in a recording studio in December 1964. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.

    • 1965


    • 1966


    • 1967


    • 1968

      • March, 1968: As a result of his de facto removal Pink Floyd's partnership with Peter Jenner and Andrew King was dissolved in March 1968. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
      • 1968: They developed their new material while playing on the University circuit, and were joined by road manager Peter Watts, before touring across Europe in 1968. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
      • 1968: The group worked on the score for The Committee, and just before Christmas that year released "Point Me At The Sky". - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
      • 1968: Guitarist and singer David Gilmour joined the line-up, and Barrett was removed due to his increasingly erratic behaviour. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
      • 1968: The band returned to Abbey Road Studios with Smith, to record their second studio album. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.

    • 1969

  • 1970s

    • January, 1970: An early version was premièred in France in January 1970, but disagreements over its direction prompted the arrival of Ron Geesin, who worked for about a month to improve the score. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1970s: Ummagumma was quickly followed by 1970's Atom Heart Mother. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • June 27, 1970: Atom Heart Mother was massively successful in the UK,[82] and was premièred at the Bath Festival on 27 June 1970. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1970: The band also did some work on the soundtrack for a proposed cartoon series called Rollo, but a lack of funds meant that the series was never produced, and away from Pink Floyd, Waters scored the soundtrack to the 1970 film The Body (directed by Ron Geesin). - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1971: They took second place in a poll of readers by Melody Maker (behind Emerson, Lake and Palmer), and for the first time in their history were making a profit. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1971: Returning from touring Atom Heart Mother, at the start of 1971 the band began work on new material. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1971: Relics is a compilation album by Pink Floyd released in 1971. - Relics (album), Wikipedia.
    • January 20, 1972: January 20 - Pink Floyd debuts Dark Side of the Moon during a performance at The Dome, in Brighton, but due to technical difficulties, is halted during the song 'Money'. - 1972 in music, Wikipedia.
    • May, 1972: The album was recorded at Abbey Road Studios, between May 1972 and January 1973, with staff engineer Alan Parsons. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1972: They spent much of 1972 touring the new material,[104] and returned in January 1973 to complete recording. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1972: The Dark Side of the Moon Tour was a concert tour by British rock band Pink Floyd in 1972 and 1973 in support of their album The Dark Side of the Moon. - Dark Side of the Moon Tour, Wikipedia.
    • 1972: Pink Floyd: Live at Pompeii is a 1972 film featuring Pink Floyd performing six songs in the ancient Roman amphitheatre in Pompeii, Italy. - Pink Floyd: Live at Pompeii, Wikipedia.
    • March, 1973: The Dark Side of the Moon was released in March 1973, and became an instant chart success in Britain and throughout Western Europe. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • March, 1973: Throughout March 1973 it featured as part of their US tour, including a midnight performance at Radio City Music Hall in New York City on 17 March. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1973: One of the pieces turned down by Antonioni would eventually become "Us and Them" on Pink Floyd's 1973 The Dark Side of the Moon. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1974: During 1974, they had sketched out three new compositions,[124] and had performed them at a series of concerts in Europe. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1975: Its construction took up most of 1975, and in 1976 the band recorded their eighth studio album, Animals, at the new facility. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1975: Pink Floyd returned to the studio in the first week of 1975. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1975s: However, he was given his first songwriting credit on a Pink Floyd album since 1975's Wish You Were Here. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1975: Wish You Were Here (1975) - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1975: After this, he was contacted by Pink Floyd and Derek handled all the pyrotechnics on the Pink Floyd shows in 1975. - Derek Meddings, Wikipedia.
    • September 15, 1975: Pink Floyd releases their album Wish You Were Here and is a huge hit. - 1975 in music, Wikipedia.
    • December, 1976: Brian Humphries was again called upon to engineer the album,[142] which was completed in December 1976. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • January 23, 1977: Animals was released on 23 January 1977,[144] and entered the UK charts at number two, and number three in the US. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • March, 1979: However, the band's critical financial situation demanded that they leave the UK for a year or more, and recording was moved to the Super Bear Studios near Nice. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1979: The Coliseum was also one of only two US venues chosen a few years earlier when Pink Floyd performed their limited run of shows in support of their 1979 album The Wall in February 1980. - Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Wikipedia.
    • August, 1979: Production of the album continued and by August 1979 the running order was largely complete. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • November 30, 1979: The Wall was released on 30 November 1979, and topped the Billboard charts for fifteen weeks. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
  • 1980s

  • 1990s

    • May, 1993: Bob Ezrin returned to work on the album, and production moved to Astoria where from February to May 1993 the band worked on about twenty-five ideas. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • March 29, 1994: The band spent three weeks rehearsing in a hangar at Norton Air Force Base in San Bernardino, California[224] before opening on 29 March 1994 in Miami with an almost identical crew to that used for their Momentary Lapse of Reason tour. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • April, 1994: Keen to avoid competing against other album releases (as had happened with A Momentary Lapse) the band set a deadline of April 1994, at which point they would begin touring again. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1994: The Division Bell Tour was a concert tour by British rock band Pink Floyd in 1994 to support their album The Division Bell. - The Division Bell Tour, Wikipedia.
    • 1994: Brown provided some backing vocals for Pink Floyd on their 1994 album, The Division Bell, and accompanied them on tour to promote the release. - Sam Brown (singer), Wikipedia.
    • October 20, 1994: The tour ended at Earls Court on 20 October 1994 and was the group's final appearance, other than their one-off reunion in 2005 for Live 8 and their performance of "Fat Old Sun" and "The Great Gig in the Sky" in Chichester Cathedral at the funeral of their manager Steve O'Rourke who died on 30 October 2003. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • October, 1994: During a televised concert at Earls Court in October 1994, the word enigma was projected in large letters on to the backdrop of the stage. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1995: A live album of the tour Pulse, and a concert video Pulse, were released in 1995. - Pink Floyd, Wikipedia.
    • 1997: A 1997 re-release includes four bonus tracks each from Jerry Garcia and Pink Floyd that were used in the film, but not the original soundtrack. - Zabriskie Point (album), Wikipedia.
    • August 4, 1998: The anticipation of Pink Floyd reforming for Live 8 was nothing compared to the atmosphere in Heston on the 4th August 1998 when Jim, Vinny and Bren reconvened in Jim's Meadow Way recording studio in Heston to jam for nostalgia's sake. - The Starving Gypo's, Wikipedia.
  • 2000s







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