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Puerto Rico: Timeline

  
  
  
  
  
  
  

  • 2nd century

    • 120: Between AD 120 and 400 arrived the Igneri, a tribe from the South American Orinoco region. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
  • 15th century

    • 1493: This lasted until Christopher Columbus arrived in 1493. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
    • 1493: Christopher Columbus landed on the island of Puerto Rico in 1493 on his second voyage of discovery, and originally named it San Juan Bautista in honor of Saint John the Baptist. - Puerto Rico, Wikitravel.
    • November 19, 1493: When Christopher Columbus arrived in Puerto Rico during his second voyage on November 19, 1493, the island was inhabited by a group of Arawak Indians known as Taínos. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
    • November 19, 1493: When Christopher Columbus arrived at Puerto Rico during his second voyage on November 19, 1493, the island was inhabited by a group of Arawak Indians known as Taínos. - Puerto Rico, Genealogy_wikia.
    • November 22, 1493: On his second voyage Columbus sighted the island, to which he gave the name San Juan Bautista, and remained in its vicinity from the 17th to the 22nd of November 1493. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 16th century

    • 1511: The first dioceses in the Americas was erected in Puerto Rico in 1511. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
    • 1513: While Ponce was exploring Florida in 1513 the conquerors of Porto Rico had established their domination in the upper western portion of the island by a series of settlements. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1513: The arrival of its first bishop, who later also exercised the function of general inquisitor, added one more to the discordant elements ruling the island. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1520: By 1520 philanthropic churchmen directed their attention to the miserable conditions of the natives; but remedial legislation was largely nullified by the rapacity of subordinate officials, and before the end of the 16th century the natives disappeared as a distinct race. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1536: Legislation for changing the method of general government and regulating common pasturages and public property caused extreme dissatisfaction, but for many years thereafter the form of control alternated between alcaldes selected by the inhabitants and annual governors appointed by the Council of the Indies. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1595: San Juan was unsuccessfully attacked by an English fleet under Sir Francis Drake; two years later another English force, led by Sir George Cumberland, occupied the city for some weeks. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 17th century

    • 1625: Many of his manuscripts were burned by Dutch pirates when they sacked the island in 1625. - Puerto Rico, Genealogy_wikia.
  • 18th century

  • 19th century

    • 1800: This mass immigration during the 19th century helped the population grow from 155,000 in 1800 to almost a million at the close of the century. - Puerto Rico, Genealogy_wikia.
    • 1810: These parliamentary and constitutional reforms, which were in force from 1810 to 1814 and again from 1820 to 1823, were reversed twice afterwards when the traditional monarchy was restored by Ferdinand VII. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
    • 1820: Although the extravagant prices paid at first almost ruined the planters, the traffic continued to flourish in hands of foreign concessionaires until 1820, when through English influence it was abandoned. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
    • September 13, 1842: After a shakedown cruise in June and July to Puerto Rico and back, the new brig sailed out of New York harbor on 13 September 1842 bound for the Atlantic coast of Africa with dispatches for frigate Vandalia. - USS Somers (1842), Wikipedia.
    • September 30, 1858: A census conducted by royal decree on September 30,1858, gives the following totals of the Puerto Rican population at this time, with 300,430 identified as Whites ; 341,015 as Free colored; and 41,736 as Slaves. - Puerto Rico, Genealogy_wikia.
    • September 30, 1858: A census conducted by royal decree on September 30, 1858, gives the following totals of the Puerto Rican population at this time: 300,430 identified as Whites; 341,015 as Free colored; and 41,736 as Slaves. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
    • 1868: Economically the island in 1868 was in a much worse condition than thirty years before. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1868: The Revolution of 1868 in Spain promised such salutary changes for the Antilles as the introduction of political parties, the restoration of representation in the Spanish Cortes, and the enfranchisement of the slaves; but the imprudent "Insurrection of Lares," and other outbreaks of 1867-68, delayed these anticipated reforms. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1897: Luis Muñoz Rivera and others persuaded the liberal Spanish government to agree to Charters of Autonomy for Cuba and Puerto Rico. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
    • 1898: Originally settled by American aboriginals, it became a colony of Spain in the 16th century, then became a possession of the United States of America in 1898. - Puerto Rico, Memory_beta_wikia.
    • July 17, 1898: General elections were held in March and the autonomous government began to function on July 17, 1898. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
    • April 11, 1899: Citizens at birth and all persons born in Puerto Rico between 11 April 1899 and 12 January 1941, and meeting certain other technical requirements, and not citizens of the United States under any other Act, are declared to be citizens of the U.S. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
    • 1899: More than three-fourths of the inhabitants ten years of age or over were unable to read or write, and when in the following year the present system of government was established large powers were given to the commissioner of education. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
    • August 8, 1899: The coffee plantations were greatly injured by a severe hurricane which visited the island on the 8th of August 1899, but the yield for export increased from 12,157,240 lb in 1901 to 38,756,750 lh, valued at $4,693,004, in 1907. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
    • August 8, 1899: On the 8th of August 1899 the island was visited by the most destructive cyclone in its history, causing a loss of about 3500 lives and a property damage amounting to 36,000,000 pesos, the coffee industry suffering most. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 20th century

    • 1900s

      • 1900: The Foraker Act of 1900 had given Puerto Rico a certain amount of popular government including a popularly-elected House of Representatives. - Puerto Rico, Genealogy_wikia.
      • October 24, 1900: A tropical depression was first observed southeast of Puerto Rico on October 24. - 1900 Atlantic hurricane season, Wikipedia.
      • January 21, 1903: While on a return passage from Puerto Rico on 21 January 1903, the tug foundered in heavy fog off Block Island, ending her long, useful career. - USS Leyden (1865), Wikipedia.
      • 1903: The university at Rio Piedras was established by act of the insular legislature in 1903, but in 1910 only two departments had been organized - the insular normal school and the department of agriculture. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1909: A project for irrigating the district south of the mountains between Ponce and Patillas was adopted by the Porto Rican government in 1909. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1910s

      • 1910: The coffee industry had not yet recovered from the effect of the cyclone of 1899 and the unfortunate mortgage system that prevailed under the Spanish regime. - Porto Rico, 1911encyclopedia.
      • March 2, 1917: The act was signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson on 2 March 1917. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
      • 1917: Since 1917 Puerto Ricans have been included in the compulsory draft whenever it has been in effect and more than 400,000 Puerto Ricans have served in the United States Armed Forces. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
      • 1917: This Act left unchanged all the articles under the Jones Act of 1917 that regulated the relationships between Puerto Rico and the United States. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
      • October 11, 1918: The most recent major earthquake occurred on October 11, 1918 and had an estimated magnitude of 7.5 on the Richter scale. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
      • October 11, 1918: The most recent major earthquake occurred on October 11, 1918 and had an estimated magnitude of 7.5 on the Richter scale. - Puerto Rico, Genealogy_wikia.
    • 1920s

    • 1930s

    • 1940s

      • 1940s: In the late 1940s a series of projects codenamed Operation Bootstrap encouraged a significant shift to manufacture via tax exemptions. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
      • February 4, 1941: Vincennes joined other Fleet units for landing exercises at Culebra, Puerto Rico on 4 February 1941 and sent her 50 ft (15 m) boats to assist in unloading and troop debarkation drills. - USS Vincennes (CA-44), Wikipedia.
      • 1946: It culminated with the appointment by President Truman in 1946 of the first Puerto Rican-born governor, Jesús T. Piñero. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
      • 1947: The United States granted the right to democratically elect the governor of Puerto Rico. - Puerto Rico, Genealogy_wikia.
    • 1950s

    • 1960s

    • 1970s

    • 1980s

    • 1990s

      • 1990: An archaeological dig in the island of Vieques in 1990 found the remains of what is believed to be an Arcaico (Archaic) man (named Puerto Ferro man) dated to around 2000 BC. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
      • 1990: An archaeological dig in the island of Vieques in 1990 found the remains of what is believed to be an Arcaico (Archaic) man (named Puerto Ferro man) which was dated to around 2000 BCE. - Puerto Rico, Genealogy_wikia.
      • November 30, 1992: President George H. W. Bush issued a 30 November 1992 memorandum to heads of executive departments and agencies establishing the current administrative relationship between the federal government and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
      • 1993: The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit stated that Congress may unilaterally repeal the Puerto Rican Constitution or the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act and replace them with any rules or regulations of its choice. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
      • 1994: Since then, it has won more than 30 medals in international competitions, including gold in three FIBA Americas Championships and the 1994 Goodwill Games. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
      • October 13, 1997: On October 13, the low tracked over Puerto Rico and later Hispanola before emerging into the Atlantic Ocean. - Tropical Storm Grace (1997), Wikipedia.
      • 1998: It also rejects any colonial or territorial status as a status option, and vows to keep working for the enhanced Commonwealth status that was approved by the PPD in 1998 which included sovereignty, an association based on "respect and dignity between both nations", and common citizenship. - Puerto Rico, Genealogy_wikia.
      • 1998: A steady increase in hotel registrations since 1998 and the construction of new hotels and new tourism projects, such as the Puerto Rico Convention Center, indicate the current strength of the tourism industry. - Puerto Rico, Wikipedia.
  • 21st century







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