The Full Wiki

William Shakespeare: Timeline

  
  
  
  
  

  • 1450s

    • 1457: Many Shakespeares are upon the register of the gild of St Anne at Knowle from about 1457 to about 1526. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 1520s

    • 1529: Snitterfield is a village in the immediate neighbourhood of Stratford, and here Richard Shakespeare had been settled as a farmer since 1529. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 1530s

    • 1534: Shakespeares are also found as tenants on the manors belonging to the convent, and at the time of the Dissolution in 1534 one Richard Shakespeare was its bailiff and collector of rents. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 1550s

    • 1552: He was living in Stratford as early as 1552, in which year he was fined for having a dunghill in Henley Street, but he does not appear to have been a native of the town, in whose records the name is not found before his time; and he may reasonably be identified with the John Shakespeare of Snitterfield, who administered the goods of his father, Richard Shakespeare, in 1561. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1556: But Shakespeares are to be traced at Wroxall nearly as far back as at Baddesley Clinton, and there is no reason to suppose that Richard the bailiff, who was certainly still a tenant of Wroxall in 1556, had also since 1529 been farming land ten miles off at Snitterfield. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1556: To the youngest of these, Mary Arden, he left in 1556 a freehold in Aston Cantlow consisting of a farm of about fifty or sixty acres in extent, known as Asbies. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1558: The principal record of the It is worth noting that Walter Roche, who in 1558 became fellow of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, was master of the school in 1570-1572, so that its standard must have been good. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1558: A Joan was baptized in 1558 and a Margaret in 1562. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 1560s

    • 1561: From 1561 to 1563 he had been one of the two chamberlains to whom the finance of the town was entrusted. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1563: The latter was buried in 1563 and the former must also have died young, although her burial is not recorded, as a second Joan was baptized in 1569. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • April 23, 1564: 18th-century antiquaries, William Oldys and Joseph Greene, gave it as April 23, but without quoting authority for their statements, and the fact that April 23 was the day of Shakespeare's death in 1616 suggests a possible source of error. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1565: He was chosen as an alderman, and in 1568 he held the chief municipal office, that of high bailiff. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 1570s

    • 1570: It is possible that John Shakespeare carried on the farm for some time after his father's death, and that by 1570 he had also acquired a small holding called Ingon in Hampton Lucy, the next village to Snitterfield. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1575: It has sometimes been thought to have been one of two houses which formed a later purchase in 1575, but there is no evidence that these were in Henley Street at all. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1575: It has been fancied that Shakespeare was present when " certain stars shot madly from their spheres" in the Kenilworth fireworks of 1575, but if he had any such entertainment in mind it is more likely to have been the more recent one given to Elizabeth by the earl of Hertford at Elvetham in 1591. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 1580s

    • November 27, 1582: The consistory court of the Diocese of Worcester issued a marriage licence on 27 November 1582. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • November 28, 1582: Marriage is a bond dated on November 28, 1582, and executed by Fulk Sandells and John Richardson, two yeomen of Stratford who also figure in Richard Hathaway's will, as a security to the bishop for the issue of a licence for the marriage of William Shakespeare and " Anne Hathwey of Stratford," upon the consent of her friends, with one asking of the banns. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • February 2, 1585: Twins, son Hamnet and daughter Judith, followed almost two years later and were baptised on 2 February 1585. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • 1586: He had long ceased to attend the meetings of the corporation, and as a consequence he was removed in 1586 from the list of aldermen. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1589: The play contains a reference to the wars of succession in France which would fit any date from 1589 to 1594. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1589: Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1589 and 1613. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • December 28, 1589: A performance of The Comedy of Errors by "a company of base and common fellows " (including Shakespeare?) is recorded in the Gesta Grayorum as taking place in Gray's Inn hall on December 28, 1594. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 1590s


    • 1590

      • 1590s: Less bleak than the tragedies, these four plays are graver in tone than the comedies of the 1590s, but they end with reconciliation and the forgiveness of potentially tragic errors. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
      • 1590s: The first recorded works of Shakespeare are Richard III and the three parts of Henry VI, written in the early 1590s during a vogue for historical drama. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.

    • 1591

      • 1591: An attempt to date it in 1591 is hardly justified by the Nurse's references to an earthquake eleven years before and the fact that there was a real earthquake in London in 1580. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.

    • 1592

      • January 1, 1592: Strange's men seem to have been still playing Titus in January 1 593, and it was probably not transferred to Pembroke's until the companies were driven from London by the plague of that year. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1592: From this event until he emerges as an actor and rising playwright in 1592 his history is a blank, and it is impossible to say what experience may not have helped to fill it. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1592: Even if Shakespeare had been connected with Strange's men during their London seasons of 1592 and 1593, it does not seem that he travelled with them. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1592: This theory perhaps hardly takes sufficient account of the shifting combinations and recombinations of actors, especially during the disastrous plague years of 1592 to 1594. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1592: After the birth of the twins, there are few historical traces of Shakespeare until he is mentioned as part of the London theatre scene in 1592. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
      • June, 1592: Make the reference unmistakable.' The London theatres were closed, first through riots and then through plague, from June 1592 to April 1594, with the exception of about a month at each Christmas during that period; and the companies were dissolved or driven to the provinces. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1592: The latter are not known to have existed before 1592, and many difficulties would be solved by the assumption that they originated out of a division of Strange's, whose numbers, since their amalgamation with the Admiral's, may have been too much inflated to enable them to undertake as a whole the summer tour of that year. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1592: It is not known exactly when Shakespeare began writing, but contemporary allusions and records of performances show that several of his plays were on the London stage by 1592. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.

    • 1593

      • April, 1593: Venus and Adonis was published about April 1593, and Lucrece about May 1 594. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1593: And 1594, when the theatres were closed because of plague, Shakespeare published two narrative poems on erotic themes, Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
      • 1593: Pembroke's are known from a letter of Henslowe's to have been ruined by August, and it is to be suspected that Sussex's, who appeared in London for the first time at the Christmas of 1593, acquired their stock of plays and transferred these to the Chamberlain's men, when the companies were again reconstituted in the summer of 1594. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.

    • 1594

      • January 2, 1594: Henslowe records the production by this company of Titus and Andronicus as a new play on January 2 3, 1 594, only a few days before the theatres were closed by plague. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • April 1, 1594: Two years earlier he had appended the same description to a play of Tittus and Vespacia, produced by Strange's men on April 1 i, 1592. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • May 2, 1594: The wedding of Mary countess of Southampton with Sir Thomas Heneage on the 2nd of May 1594 would fit the May-day setting of the plot; but a widowed countess hardly answers to the " little western flower " of the allegory, and there are allusions to events later in 1 594 and in particular to the rainy weather of June and July, which indicate a somewhat later date. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1594: The title page of the 1594 edition of Titus Andronicus reveals that the play had been acted by three different troupes. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
      • 1594: They were playing at Newington Butts, and probably also at the Rose on Bankside, and at the Cross Keys in the city. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1594: Some of Shakespeare's plays were published in quarto editions from 1594. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
      • 1594: The series as revised can only be intended to lead directly up to Richard III., and this relationship, together with its style as compared with that of the plays belonging to the autumn of 1594, suggest the short winter season of1592-1593as the most likely time for the production of Richard III. There is a difficulty in that it is not included in Henslowe's list of the plays acted by Lord Strange's men during that season. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • September 2, 1594: Strange, who had succeeded to his father's title on September 2 5, 1 593), Pembroke and Sussex. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.

    • 1595

      • January 26, 1595: The wedding of William Stanley, earl of Derby, brother of the lord Strange for whose players Shakespeare had written, and Elizabeth Vere, daughter of the earl of Oxford, which took place at Greenwich on the 26th of January 1595, perhaps fits the conditions best. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.

    • 1596

      • 1596: Another step was taken to secure the dignity of the family by an application in the course of 1596 to the heralds for the confirmation of a coat of arms said to have been granted to John Shakespeare while he was bailiff of Stratford. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1596: But both of these seem to have passed subsequently to his brother Henry, who was buried at Snitterfield in 1596. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1596: The year before he bought New Place as his family home in Stratford, Shakespeare was living in the parish of St. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
      • 1596: Here Malone thought that he had evidence, now lost, of his residence in Southwark as early as 1596, and as late as 1608. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • July 22, 1596: At the death of the lord chamberlain on the 22nd of July 1596, it passed under the protection of his successor, George, 2nd Lord Hunsdon, and once more became " the Lord Chamberlain's men " when he was appointed to that office on the 17th of March 1597. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • August 11, 1596: Hamnet died of unknown causes at the age of 11 and was buried on 11 August 1596. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.

    • 1597

      • 1597: William known that payments of subsidy were due from him p y y for 1597 and 1598 in the parish of St Helen's, Bishops gate, and that an arrear was ultimately collected in the liberty of the Clink. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1597: The prosecutions for debt ceased, and in 1597 a fresh action was brought in Chancery for the recovery of Asbies from the Lamberts. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1597: Shakespeare made an important purchase for £60 of the house and gardens of New Place in Chapel Street. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.

    • 1598

      • 1598: Perhaps the most interesting of these from the biographical point of view are those contained in the Palladis Tamia, a kind of literary handbook published by Francis Meres in 1598; for Meres not only extols him as " the most excellent in both kinds [i.e. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1598: By 1598, his name had become a selling point and began to appear on the title pages. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
      • 1598: The correspondence of his neighbours, the Quineys, in 1598 contains an application to him for a loan to Richard Quiney upon a visit to London, and a discussion of possible investments for him in the neighbourhood of Stratford. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1598: The Theatre was pulled down in 1598, and, after a short interval during which the company may have played at the Curtain, also in Shoreditch, Richard Burbage and his brother Cuthbert rehoused them in the Globe on Bankside, built in part out of the materials of the Theatre. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.

    • 1599

      • 1599: Two early drafts of sonnets 138 and 144 appeared in The Passionate Pilgrim, published under Shakespeare's name but without his permission. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
      • 1599: A partnership of company members built their own theatre on the south bank of the Thames, which they called the Globe. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
      • 1599: A date at the end of 1599 or the beginning of 1600, shortly after the completion of the historical Falstaff plays, would be the most natural one for this enterprise, and with such a date the evidence of style agrees. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
      • 1599: The completion of the Lancastrian series of histories by V. can be safely placed in or about 1599, since there is an allusion in one of the choruses to the military operations in Ireland of the earl of Essex,who crossed on March 2 7 and returned on September 28, 1599. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 1600s

    • 1600: Entries in the Register of copyrights kept by the Company of Stationers indicate that editions of As You Like It and Anthony and Cleopatra were contemplated but not published in 1600 and 1608 respectively. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1600: An entry in the Stationers' Register during 1600 shows that Much Ado About Nothing was in existence, although its publication was then directed to be " stayed." It may plausibly be regarded as the earliest play not included in Meres's list. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1600: Some features of the so-called Ur-Hamlet may perhaps be traceable in the German play of Der bestrafte Brudermord. There is an allusion in Hamlet to the rivalry between the ordinary stages and the private plays given by boy actors, which points to a date during the vogue of the children of the Chapel, whose performance began late in 1600, and another to an inhibition of plays on account of a " late innovation, " by which the Essex rising of February 1601 may be meant. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • February, 1601: There is some reason to suppose that this was due to a popular tendency to draw seditious parallels between Richard and Elizabeth; and it became one of the charges against the earl of Essex and his fellow-conspirators in the abortive emeute of February 1601, that they had procured a performance of a play on Richard's fate in order to stimulate their followers. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • February, 1601: At the command of some of the followers of Essex as a prelude to the disastrous rising of February 1601. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1602: An alleged performance at Harefield in 1602 certainly rests upon a forgery. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1602: But the evidence does not really bear out these theories, and the style of the whole must be regarded as quite consistent with a date in 160r or 1602. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1602: It is almost wholly on grounds of style that All's Well that Ends Well is placed by most critics in or about 1602, and, as in the case of Troilus and Cressida, it has been argued, though with little justification, that parts of the play are of considerably earlier date, and perhaps represent the Love's Labour's Won referred to by Meres. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1603: They travelled again during 1603 when the plague was in London, and during at any rate portions of the summers or autumns of most years thereafter. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1604: If this is correct the play was probably produced when the theatres were reopened after the plague in 1604. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • November 1, 1604: Although the performance records are patchy, the King's Men performed seven of Shakespeare's plays at court between 1 November 1604 and 31 October 1605, including two performances of The Merchant of Venice. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • November 1, 1604: A performance at court of Othello on November 1, 1604, is noted in the same records as those quoted with regard to Measure for Measure, and the play may be reasonably assigned to the same year. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • December 26, 1604: 27. Measure for Measure is believed to have been played at court on the 26th of December 1604. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1605: The absence of his name from the 1605 cast list for Jonson’s Volpone is taken by some scholars as a sign that his acting career was nearing its end. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • 1606: It also contains some profane expressions which have been modified in the Folio, and thereby points to a date for the original production earlier than the Act to Restrain Abuses of Players passed in the spring of 1606. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1608: After 1608, they performed at the indoor Blackfriars Theatre during the winter and the Globe during the summer. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • 1609: A third narrative poem, A Lover's Complaint, in which a young woman laments her seduction by a persuasive suitor, was printed in the first edition of the Sonnets in 1609. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
  • 1610s

    • 1610: About 1610 Shakespeare seems to have left London, and entered upon the definite occupation of his house at New Place, Stratford. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1610: The play was revived in 1610 and Simon Forman saw it at the Globe on April 20. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1612: He was called as a witness in a court case concerning the marriage settlement of Mountjoy's daughter, Mary. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • 1613: He devised an impresa, or emblem, to be painted by Richard Burbage, and worn in the tilt on Accession day by the earl of Rutland, who had been one of the old circle of Southampton and Essex. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • June 29, 1613: At Stratford the last few of the plays may have been written, but it is reasonable to suppose that Shakespeare's connexion with the King's company ended when the Globe was burnt down during a performance of VIII. on the 29th of June 1613. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • April 23, 1616: In any case his birthday cannot have been later than April 23, since the inscription upon his monument is evidence that on April 23, 1616, he had already begun his fifty-third year. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • April 23, 1616: Shakespeare died on 23 April 1616[55] and was survived by his wife and two daughters. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • April 23, 1616: A month after his will was signed, on the 23rd of April 1616, Shakespeare died, and as a tithe-owner was buried in the chancel of the parish church. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1616: The 1616 edition of Ben Jonson's Works names him on the cast lists for Every Man in His Humour (1598) and Sejanus, His Fall (1603). - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • 1616: His sister Joan had married William Hart, a hatter, and in 1616 was dwelling in one of his houses in Henley Street. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 1620s

    • 1623: Sometime before 1623, a funerary monument was erected in his memory on the north wall, with a half-effigy of him in the act of writing. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • 1623: They were not included in the First Folio of 1623, nor in a reprint of it in 1632, known as the Second Folio; but all seven were appended to the second issue (1664) of the Third Folio (1663), and to the Fourth Folio of 1685. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
    • 1623: Shakespeare's works include the 36 plays printed in the First Folio of 1623, listed below according to their folio classification as comedies, histories and tragedies. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • 1623: In the case of King Lear, however, while most modern additions do conflate them, the 1623 folio version is so different from the 1608 quarto, that the Oxford Shakespeare prints them both, arguing that they cannot be conflated without confusion. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
    • August 6, 1623: Anne Shakespeare followed her husband on the 6th of August 1623. - William Shakespeare, 1911encyclopedia.
  • 1650s

    • September 9, 1653: (Such registrations were claims to the rights to publish a given work, and had to precede any legal publication.) On 9 September 1653, Moseley registered the play Cardenio as the work of William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, and plays titled Henry I and Henry II as the work of Shakespeare and Robert Davenport. - Humphrey Moseley, Wikipedia.
  • 1660s

    • 1660: Between the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660 and the end of the seventeenth century, classical ideas were in vogue. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
  • 1750s

    • 1757: The strongest evidence might be a Catholic statement of faith signed by John Shakespeare, found in 1757 in the rafters of his former house in Henley Street. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
  • 1760s

    • 1765: A series of scholarly editions of his work, notably those of Samuel Johnson in 1765 and Edmond Malone in 1790, added to his growing reputation. - William Shakespeare, Wikipedia.
  • 1810s

    • February 19, 1819: "Shakespeare led a life of Allegory; his works are the comments on it." - William Shakespeare, Wikiquote.
  • 1940s







Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message